Academics

Information about curriculum in all content areas.

Printable version of Kamiakin Course Catalog 2018-2019

6th Grade Courses

Core Courses

Language Arts

In Language Arts, students develop their vocabulary and reading comprehension skills in a variety of literary and informational
texts, through both in-class and independent reading experiences. They deepen what they know about texts by analyzing literary/story elements, literary devices, and text organizational structures. They learn to evaluate texts and authors and to share reading experiences with others. In writing, students build on what they have learned in previous grades about writing for different audiences and purposes, the writing process and traits of effective writing. They deepen their understanding and skills with regard to expository writing and are introduced to persuasive writing. They learn to evaluate their own writing and to reflect on their own progress as writers.

Reading informational Text

  • Key Ideas and Details
    • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
    • Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
    • Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through example and anecdotes).
  • Craft and Structure
    • Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings.
    • Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
      Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
    • Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
    • Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
    • Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
    • Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
  • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

REading Literature

  • Key Ideas and Details
    • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
    • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
    • Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
  • Craft and Structure
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
    • Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
    • Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
    • Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
    • Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
    • Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
  • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teachers

Social Studies

Civics

  • Understands a variety of forms of government from the past or present.
  • Analyzes how societies have interacted with one another in the past or present.

Economics and Geography

  • Understands the production, distribution, and consumption of goods,services, and resources in societies from the past or in the present.
  • Identifies the location of places and regions in the world and understands their physical and cultural characteristics.
  • Understands and analyzes how the environment has affected people and how people have affected the environment in the past or present.
  • Understands the characteristics of cultures in the world from the past or in the present.

History

  • Understands and analyzes how cultures and cultural groups in ancient civilizations contributed to world history.
  • Understands and analyzes how technology and ideas from ancient civilizations have impacted world history.

Social Studies Skills

Understands and demonstrates the ethical responsibility one has in using and citing sources and the rules related to plagiarism and copyrighting.

Teachers

Science

Physical Science

  • Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.
  • Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.
  • Conduct an investigation and evaluate the experimental design to provide evidence that fields exist between objects exerting forces on each other even though the objects are not in contact.
  • Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.
  • Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in a wave.
  • Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.
  • Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information to support the claim that digitized signals are a more reliable way to encode and transmit information than analog signals.

Earth and Space Science

  • Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscience processes have changed Earth’s surface at varying time and spatial scales.
  • Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
  • Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
  • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.

Engineering and Technology

  • Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.
  • Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
  • Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
  • Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

Life Science

  • Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
  • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.
  • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
  • Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
  • Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Teachers

Mathematics

Mathematics

  • Ratio & Proportional Relationships
    • Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
  • The Number System
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to divide fractions by fractions.
    • Compute fluently with multi-digit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.
  • Expressions & Equations
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
    • Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
    • Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.
  • Geometry
    • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume.
  • Statistics & Probability
    • Develop understanding of statistical variability.
    • Summarize and describe distributions.

Teachers

Elective

Fitness Level I

  • Develops motor skills and movement concepts as developmentally appropriate.
  • Acquires the knowledge and skills to safely participate in a variety of developmentally appropriate physical activities.
  • Understands the components of health-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
  • Understands the components of skill-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
  • Analyzes personal fitness information to develop and monitor a fitness plan.

Computer

  • Focus on the LWSD Technology Standards.
  • In this class, students will develop skills in Keyboarding, Desktop Publishing, Digital Presentations and Digital Citizenship.
  • We will be using Microsoft Office 2016 as the base for the curriculum.
  • The primary course components will include: Type to Learn, Word 2016, PowerPoint 2016, Publisher 2016, Excel 2016 and Microsoft Movie Maker.
  • For more information please contact Christina Gregori (pictured)

Art Adventure 1,2

  • This class will create with everything from the techniques of clay to the beauty of three dimensional shading.
  • We will look into history to study some of the Art Masters and interpret their styles into a painting, a painting filled with expressive paint, like the impressionists.
  • Come learn more about the arts and how to use them as an expressive form of communication.
  • Did you know that visual art is a language all its own and that developing this language can help your brain process other subjects too!
  • Let’s learn more about the language of visual art. Creativity is powerful, come join the adventure.
  • For more information please contact Rachael Larsen (pictured)

Food Foundations

  • Throughout our lives we develop a relationship with food. In this class you will prepare an impressive variety of foods.
  • Students exhibit initiative, organization, creativity, independence and personal responsibility.
  • Topics covered include use of small and large appliances, lab planning and preparation skills, use of class time, measuring/mixing equipment/skills, teamwork, leadership and organizational skills.
  • Areas of study include; sanitation and safety, kitchen equipment cooking methods, kitchen math and science, recipes and food labels, production and meal planning, food groups, etc.
  • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

Consumer Life Skills

  • This course examines life management skills in the areas of food, wellness, textiles (sewing), personal and family living, nutrition, financial management, interior design, appropriate child development practices and job skills.
  • Emphasis is placed on students applying these skills during their pre-teen years.
  • This course offers flexibility for beginning students as well as advanced students in Family and Consumer Sciences content area.
  • This is a class you will never forget. Sign up and learn something new that applies to your life.
  • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor

Music

Jazz Ensemble

  • This group is Kamiakin’s most mobile and busy ensemble with many bookings each year at regular concerts, community events, fundraisers and school functions.
  • The main focus throughout the school year will be on the famous “big band” styles of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and other notable big bands.
  • Kamiakin’s Jazz Ensemble also breaks into smaller groups to study “combo” and “Dixieland” styles.
  • Opportunities for improvisation abound in all types of jazz offered as Kamiakin’s jazz musicians maintain a tradition of excellence.
  • Students interested in auditioning for and performing with our award-winning Jazz Ensemble are expected to have attained a reasonable amount of skill and technique on their instrument in order to perform selections acceptably.
  • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey

Orchestra

  • The string orchestra is an excellent opportunity for students to expand their musical repertoire from all periods of history and musical styles while obtaining more advanced skills.
  • The class will focus on musicianship and ensemble playing with an emphasis on technical skills such as intonation, vibrato, shifting and bow technique.
  • We will perform at school concerts and district festivals.
  • Opportunities to join the district honor group and to play at the solo/ensemble festivals are available for more advanced students.
  • For more information please contact Kim Merkley

Concert Band

  • Kamiakin’s Concert Band is a fantastic way to make friends and music as you enter into your middle school experience! This course is open to all instrumentalists who have completed elementary band at any school (special permission may be given to musically-trained students wishing to begin band in 6th grade).
  • The emphasis of the class is on growing together as a well balanced group, musical excellence and individual progress.
  • In addition to quarterly concerts, this band represents Kamiakin at our district band festival (road trip!) and members have the chance to play as a soloist or in a small ensemble every March.
  • Students enrolled in this band will also have the opportunity to audition for Washington’s “Jr. All-State Band”! In middle school, musical literature is carefully selected to enhance the band’s overall sound and experience.
  • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey
  • Assessments
  • Weekly practice logs
    • In class playing tests
    • Music theory test/quizzes
    • SmartMusic® recording projects
    • Concert performances
    • Written self and peer evaluations
    • Written concert review/evaluation
    • Resources/ Technology
  • Various band method books
    • Concert literature
    • Listening examples
    • Electronic tuner
    • Metronome
    • Music theory and rhythm study software
    • SmartMusic® software
    • Units
      • Rhythmic Analysis: Level I (6th grade)
        Areas of Focus: Music theory & time analysis in conjunction with metronome.
        Assessment Tools: Submitted via recording throughout year.
      • Study and mastery of three common key signatures: Bb, Eb, Ab
        Areas of Focus: Basic music theory & intervals (half steps, whole steps, ascending/descending).
        Assessment Tools: Visual hand cues indicating sharps/flats, implementation in chorales (Swearingen chorale book) and literature.
      • Introduction of “EIP” grant.
        Areas of Focus: Introduction to instrument(s), proper choice made, basic skills within the three “EIP” sections.
        Assessment Tools: Assessed by Seattle Youth Symphony and band director each May.
      • Rehearsal & Performance Literature
        Areas of Focus: Selections are based on strengths and weaknesses of the band.
        Assessment Tools: Ongoing assessment throughout year while highlighting performance pieces.
      • Tone production, instrumental technique & facility
        Areas of Focus: Individual growth and technical facility on instrument.
        Assessment Tools: Chair tryouts (4 per year, alternating between in-class and individually recorded). Rubric is used to gauge five main points of excerpt.
      • Solo/Ensemble
        Areas of Focus: Individual and/or small group preparation for judged festival.
        Assessment Tools: Professional adjudicator offers ratings of I, II, III, IV or V.
      • “Winterfest” performance
        Areas of Focus: Large group preparation & performance at district event. “Training” for more distant trips.
        Assessment Tools: Successful trip and performance with instruments, music, logistics, equipment vans, uniforms, etc.
  • Additional Programs

    ELL Language Arts

    • This course focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary and strategies for reading and writing. ELL addresses the needs of culturally diverse, non-English or limited-English speaking students.
    • Students will learn to read, write and speak English. Students qualify for ELL by taking the Washington Language Proficiency Test (WLPT). Students will use the “6 + 1 traits” and “Step Up to Writing” to learn writing skills. Students write a compare/contrast essay, a five paragraph essay and a persuasive essay. They read fiction and non-fiction pieces from the Prentice Hall Literature book as well as other selections.
    • Weekly computer sessions using “Rosetta Stone” (an individualized computer language program) reinforce language skills. Oral communication is developed through question and answering sessions as well as giving oral reports.
    • To get more information about this program please contact Kendall Schuldt OR Click here

    Special Education

    • Special education staff at Kamiakin Middle School provide specially designed instruction in basic skill areas.
    • Students who qualify for special education services in the areas of math, reading, or written language are offered regularly scheduled courses in a small group setting.
    • Research based curriculum in each course provides remediation in that basic skill area.
    • The aim of this remediation is to offer students strategies and skills which will help them to be successful in the general education classroom and strive toward district and state standards.
    • Kamiakin students with developmental or physical difficulties will have individualized programs designed to meet each student’s specific needs.
    • These programs will be developed through the IEP process by specialists, parents, and general education faculty in order to meet developmental needs while involving each student in the Kamiakin Community.
    • To get more information about this program please contact Karyn George (pictured left) or Liz Spier (pictured right) OR Click here

    Quest Program

    • Quest is open to all students residing within the district who meet district criteria for identifying highly capable students.
    • Applicants must apply through the Quest office and must demonstrate high academic achievement and cognitive ability.
    • Quest offers acceleration and enrichment of core curriculum in the areas of language arts, social studies, and science. Providing academic challenge for highly capable learners, classes include greater breadth and depth of subject matter, a wide variety of learning processes and teaching methods, and high expectations for student work and achievement.
    • The core classes in the Quest program demand students use full intellectual capacity to stretch their minds beyond the bounds of the traditional middle school curriculum.
    • Students engage in critical thinking, reading and writing activities that are more often found in high school classes.
    • They are expected to be self-directed, maintain above average grades, and complete quality work.
    • Click here to get more information about this program.

    7th Grade Courses

    Core Courses

    Language Arts

    Reading informational text

    • Key Ideas and Details
      • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
      • Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
      • Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).
    • Craft and Structure
      • Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
      • Analyze the structure and author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of ideas.
      • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.
    • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
      • Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of words).
      • Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.
      • Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts. Range.
    • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
      • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

    Reading Literature

    • Key Ideas and Details
      • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
      • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
      • Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters and plot).
    • Craft and Structure
      • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
      • Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.
      • Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.
    • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
      • Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).
      • (Not applicable when applied to literature)
      • Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.
    • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
      • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

    Teachers

    Social Studies

    Civics

    • Understands key ideals and principles outlined in the Declaration of Independence, including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and the U.S. Constitution, including the rule of law, separation of powers, representative government, and popular sovereignty, and the Bill of Rights, including due process and freedom of expression.
    • Evaluates efforts to reduce discrepancies between democratic ideals and reality in the United States, including: How amendments to the Constitution have sought to extend rights to new groups; and How democratic ideals and constitutional principles set forth in fundamental documents relate to public issues.
    • Understands and analyzes the structure and powers of government at the national level.
    • Analyzes an issue that attempts to balance individual rights and the common good.

    Economics

    • Analyzes examples of how groups and individuals consider profit and personal values in making economic choices in United States history.

    Geography

    • Analyzes maps and charts from a specific time period or event to make an historical interpretation.
    • Understands and analyzes migration as a catalyst on the growth of the United States.

    History

    Understands how the following themes and developments help to define eras in US history from 1763-1877:

    • Fighting for independence, Revolution and framing the Constitution
    • Slavery, expansion, removal, and reform
    • Civil War and Reconstruction

    Social Studies Skills

    • Creates and uses research questions that are tied to an essential question to focus inquiry on social studies issues and historical events.

    Teachers

    Science

    Physical Science

    • Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
    • Gather and make sense of information to describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources and impact society.
    • Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two Colliding objects.
    • Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
    • Construct and present arguments using evidence to support the claim that gravitational interactions are attractive and depend on the masses of interacting objects.
    • Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic Energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.

    Life Science

    • Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
    • Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
    • Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
    • Develop and use a model to describe why structural changes to genes (mutations) located n chromosomes may affect proteins and may result in harmful, beneficial, or neutral effects to the structure and function of the organism.
    • Develop and use a model to describe why asexual reproduction results in offspring with Identical genetic information and sexual reproduction results in offspring with genetic variation
    • Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
    • Apply scientific ideas to construct an explanation for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms to infer evolutionary relationships.
    • Analyze displays of pictorial data to compare patterns of similarities in the embryological development across multiple species to identify relationships not evident in the fully formed anatomy.

    Earth and Space Science

    • Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
    • Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
    • Develop and use a model to describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.
    • Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.
    • Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century.

    Teachers

    Mathematics

    7th Grade Mathematics

    • Ratio & Proportional Relationships
      • Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
    • The Number System
      • Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply and divide rational numbers.
    • Expressions & Equations
      • Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
      • Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.
    • Geometry
      • Draw, construct, and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them.
      • Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume.
    • Statistics & Probability
      • Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population.
      • Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations.
      • Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

    Algebra

    • Quantities
      • Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
    • The Real Number System
      • Extend the properties of exponents to rational exponents and use properties of rational and irrational numbers.
    • Creating Equations
      • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
    • Seeing Structure in Expressions
      • Interpret the structure of expressions, perform arithmetic operations on polynomials, and write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
    • Reasoning with Equations & Inequalities
      • Solve equations and inequalities in one variable. 6. Represent and solve systems of equations and inequalities.
    • Interpreting Functions
      • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation.
      • Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of a context.
      • Analyze functions using different representations.
    • Building Functions
      • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities and build new functions from existing functions.
    • Linear, Quadratic, & Exponential Models
      • Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models, solve problems, and interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
    • Interpreting Categorical & Quantitative Data
      • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.
      • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables, and interpret linear models.
    • Building Functions
      • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities and build new functions from existing functions.

    Teachers

    Electives

    Health

    • Explains the relationship of nutrition and food nutrients to body composition and physical performance.
    • Explains the foundations of health and analyzes personal behaviors.
    • Explains the stages of growth and development.
    • Explains the concepts of prevention and control of disease.
    • Acquires skills to live safely and reduce health risks.

    Fitness Level I

    • Develops motor skills and movement concepts as developmentally appropriate.
    • Acquires the knowledge and skills to safely participate in a variety of developmentally appropriate physical activities.
    • Understands the components of health-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
    • Understands the components of skill-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
    • Analyzes personal fitness information to develop and monitor a fitness plan.

    Consumer Life Skills

    • This course examines life management skills in the areas of food, wellness, textiles (sewing), personal and family living, nutrition, financial management, interior design, appropriate child development practices and job skills.
    • Emphasis is placed on students applying these skills during their pre-teen years. This course offers flexibility for beginning students as well as advanced students in Family and Consumer Sciences content area.
    • This is a class you will never forget. Sign up and learn something new that applies to your life.
    • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

    Art Exploration

    • This course is filled with projects and activities that will boost your critical thinking habits, improve your collaborative participation, grown your creativity, and develop your communication skills though making, writing, and talking about art. We will focus our learning of art through a variety of materials, a weekly Mystery Artist, and productive studio habits.
      In this class you will...
      • Create all sorts of amazing ART!
      • Develop your knowledge of color theory, drawings, and painting skills, and basic sculpture techniques
      • Organize a sketchbook to form and share your ideas and keep track of information
      • Discuss art and artists from across the world and through time
      • Interpret intent, function, and meaning in artwork and artistic movements
      • Work collaboratively to generate artistic ideas and problem solve
      • Convey personal meaning through the creation and presentation of artwork
      • Reflect and critique the art work created by you and your peers.
    • For more information please contact Rachael Larsen (pictured)

    Digital Photography

    • This course will focus on the knowledge, skills and techniques, and creative process of Photographic Art. In this course you will delve into an abundance of artists, graphic styles, and motivations while building your skills to be more creative in your photographic artistic abilities. In addition you will become familiar with various careers and opportunities in the photographic art. In this class you will...
      • Create all sorts of amazing photographic ART!
      • Develop your knowledge of camera functions and photography techniques
      • Develop skills to digitally manipulate images with Photoshop software
      • Convey personal meaning through the creation and presentation of artwork
      • Discuss photographic art and artists from across the world and through time
      • Interpret intent, function, and meaning in artwork and artistic movements
      • Work collaboratively to generate artistic ideas and problem solve
      • Reflect and critique the art work created by you and your peers

      For more information please contact Rachael Larsen (pictured)

      Foods and Culinary Foundations

      • If you would like the opportunity to advance your skills in the kitchen, this is the class for you.
      • As you develop your skills, you are able to become more creative with the dishes you prepare.
      • In this course you will have the opportunity to take your previous skills to the next level by planning and preparing your own meals, then demonstrating your consumer awareness through grocery and product selection.
      • In addition, you will become familiar with various careers and opportunities in the food industry.
      • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

      International Foods

      • If you would like to travel the world together—tasting the different kinds of foods from many cultures, this is the class for you!
      • This semester course is designed for the student who wishes to prepare a variety of foods originating from all over the world.
      • Various regions of the world will be covered including North America, Latin America, Europe, the Mediterranean, Asia, and the Mid-East among others. Various preparation techniques reflecting individual ethnic cooking styles will also be demonstrated as an essential part of the class.
      • Students will study patterns of family meals, current customs and food habits, and cooking techniques and equipment unique to those countries. Sign up for this class if you enjoy tasting foods from around the world.
      • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

      Leadership

      • Leadership gives students the opportunity to learn new ways in which they can become successful leaders at Kamiakin, in their community, family, and personal relationships.
      • Based on the idea that true leadership is about serving others, this course will focus on understanding personality traits, character development, personal growth, and building strong relationships and teams.
      • Also covered will be listening and speaking skills, conflict mediation, diversity acceptance, and a community service project. In addition to being role models for their peers, all members of the leadership class are also expected to help plan and participate in school-wide initiatives and activities such as assemblies, dances, fundraisers, and ongoing community building.
      • Come have fun, work hard, and make Kamiakin a better place!
      • For more information please contact Karyn Taggart (pictured)

      Team Sports

      • Students in Team Sports will learn and apply physical fitness concepts, principles and strategies that promote lifelong fitness.
      • Emphasis in Team Sports will be on improving skills such as throwing, catching, striking and kicking. Students will apply skills in a variety of team sports and will be introduced to regulation rules and advanced play.
      • This course is designed to be a competitive class and will present the opportunity for all students to participate in a variety of team sports.
      • Emphasis will also be placed on teamwork, sportsmanship, healthy competition, and improving skills through participation and practice.
      • Activities may include the following: basketball, volleyball, flag/flash football, softball, floor hockey, soccer, ultimate Frisbee, and soft lacrosse.
      • For more information please contact Azuma Barden, Neil Kells or Sue Smith

      Individual/Dual Sports

      • This course is designed for the self-motivated individual who would like to improve their physical fitness.
      • Emphasis will be placed on cooperative play and aerobic activities. This class will also provide opportunities for all students to learn fundamental techniques, rules, and strategies used in individual and dual sports.
      • Units may include tennis, bowling, badminton, archery, pickleball and Frisbee golf. The development and practice of skills through competitive play will be offered.
      • This is a great opportunity for students to enhance their personal fitness, individual skills and to work with others in a partner setting.
      • For more information please contact Azuma Bearden, Neil Kells or Sue Smith

      Music

      Symphonic Band

      • Kamiakin’s Symphonic Band is open to all 7th grade instrumentalists who have completed 6th grade band.
      • Symphonic Band rehearses daily in order to perform for quarterly concerts, community functions, Seattle Center’s “Winterfest” (road trip!), and the district’s Solo/Ensemble festival.
      • The musical selections studied and worked on by the Symphonic Band are more advanced and are chosen to highlight the band’s overall sound as well as individual members as soloists.
      • Symphonic Band members delve into musical sophistication through medium-advanced band repertoire, contemporary movie scores, solos, basic music theory and conducting. Playing beyond just “notes and rhythms”, the band analyzes the emotion and intent conveyed by composers and learns to convey those messages to our audience. Selected members may perform with the Washington Jr. All-State Band in Olympia.
      • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey
      • Units
        • Rhythmic Analysis: Level III (7th grade)
          Areas of Focus: Basic music theory & time.
          Assessment Tools: Submitted via recording.
        • Study of 12 Major scales
          Areas of Focus: Basic music theory & intervals.
          Assessment Tools: Submitted via recording.
        • “EIP” introduction to bassoon, French horn & tuba
          Areas of Focus: Instrumentation & balance.
          Assessment Tools: Professional musicians & band director assess quality of candidates and balance throughout group.
        • Rehearsal & Performance Literature
        • Areas of Focus: Selections are based on strengths and weaknesses of the band.
          Assessment Tools: Ongoing assessment throughout year while highlighting performance pieces.
        • Tone production, instrumental technique & facility
          Areas of Focus: Individual growth.
          Assessment Tools: Chair tryouts (1 each quarter, alternating between in-class and individually recorded). Rubric is used to gauge five main points of excerpt.
        • Solo/Ensemble
          Areas of Focus: Individual and/or small group preparation for judged festival.
          Assessment Tools: Professional adjudicator offers ratings of I, II, III, IV or V.
        • District Band Festival
          Areas of Focus: Large group preparation & performance at judged festival
          Assessment Tools: Local directors offer comments to each band regarding overall success & ideas for improvement.

      Jazz Ensemble

      • This group is Kamiakin’s most mobile and busy ensemble with many bookings each year at regular concerts, community events, fundraisers and school functions.
      • The main focus throughout the school year will be on the famous “big band” styles of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and other notable big bands. Kamiakin’s Jazz Ensemble also breaks into smaller groups to study “combo” and “Dixieland” styles.
      • Opportunities for improvisation abound in all types of jazz offered as Kamiakin’s jazz musicians maintain a tradition of excellence. Students interested in auditioning for and performing with our award-winning Jazz Ensemble are expected to have attained a reasonable amount of skill and technique on their instrument in order to perform selections acceptably.
      • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey

      Orchestra

      • The string orchestra is an excellent opportunity for students to expand their musical repertoire from all periods of history and musical styles while obtaining more advanced skills.
      • The class will focus on musicianship and ensemble playing with an emphasis on technical skills such as intonation, vibrato, shifting and bow technique.
      • We will perform at school concerts and district festivals.
      • Opportunities to join the district honor group and to play at the solo/ensemble festivals are available for more advanced students.
      • For more information please contact Kim Merkley (pictured)

      Additional Programs

      ELL Language Arts

      • This course focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary and strategies for reading and writing.
      • ELL addresses the needs of culturally diverse, non-English or limited-English speaking students. Students will learn to read, write and speak English. Students qualify for ELL by taking the Washington Language Proficiency Test (WLPT). Students will use the “6 + 1 traits” and “Step Up to Writing” to learn writing skills.
      • Students write a compare/contrast essay, a five paragraph essay and a persuasive essay. They read fiction and non-fiction pieces from the Prentice Hall Literature book as well as other selections.
      • Weekly computer sessions using “Rosetta Stone” (an individualized computer language program) reinforce language skills. Oral communication is developed through question and answering sessions as well as giving oral reports.
      • For more information please contact Kendall Schuldt (pictured) or Click here .

      Special Education

      Accordion

      • Special education staff at Kamiakin Middle School provide specially designed instruction in basic skill areas.
      • Students who qualify for special education services in the areas of math, reading, or written language are offered regularly scheduled courses in a small group setting.
      • Research based curriculum in each course provides remediation in that basic skill area.
      • The aim of this remediation is to offer students strategies and skills which will help them to be successful in the general education classroom and strive toward district and state standards.
      • Kamiakin students with developmental or physical difficulties will have individualized programs designed to meet each student’s specific needs.
      • These programs will be developed through the IEP process by specialists, parents, and general education faculty in order to meet developmental needs while involving each student in the Kamiakin Community.
      • For more information please contact Karyn George (pictured left) or Liz Spier (pictured right) OR Click here .

      Quest Program

      • Quest is open to all students residing within the district who meet district criteria for identifying highly capable students.
      • Applicants must apply through the Quest office and must demonstrate high academic achievement and cognitive ability.
      • Quest offers acceleration and enrichment of core curriculum in the areas of language arts, social studies, and science.
      • Providing academic challenge for highly capable learners, classes include greater breadth and depth of subject matter, a wide variety of learning processes and teaching methods, and high expectations for student work and achievement.
      • The core classes in the Quest program demand students use full intellectual capacity to stretch their minds beyond the bounds of the traditional middle school curriculum.
      • Students engage in critical thinking, reading and writing activities that are more often found in high school classes. They are expected to be self-directed, maintain above average grades, and complete quality work.
      • Click here to get more information about this program.

      8th Grade Courses

      Core Courses

      Language Arts

      Reading Informational Text

      • Key Ideas and Details
        • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
        • Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
        • Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories)
      • Craft and Structure
        • Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.
        • Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept.
        • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
      • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
        • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea.
        • Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced.
        • Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation.
      • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
        • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently independently and proficiently.

      Reading Literature

      • Key Ideas and Details
        • Cite textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
        • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
        • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
      • Craft and Structure
        • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.
        • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.
        • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.)
      • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
        • Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. (Not applicable when applied to literature)
        • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.
      • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
        • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

      writing

      • Text Types and Purposes
        • Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
        • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
        • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
      • Production and Distribution of Writing
        • Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
        • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
        • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      • Range of Writing
        • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

      Teachers

      Social Studies

      Civics

      • Understands how key ideals set forth in fundamental documents, including the Washington State Constitution and tribal treaties, define the goals of our state.
      • Evaluates efforts to reduce discrepancies between democratic ideals and reality in the United States and Washington state including the Civil Rights Movement.
      • Understands and analyzes the structure, organization and powers of government at the local, state and tribal levels.

      Economics

      • Analyzes how the forces of supply and demand have affected the production, distribution and consumption of goods, services and resources.

      Geography

      • Understands and analyzes how the environment has affected people and how people have affected the environment in U.S. history and Washington state history.

      History

      • Understands how the following themes and developments help to define eras in U.S. history and Washington’s history
      • Development and struggles in the West, including Washington Territory, treaties, and statehood
      • Industrialization, railroads, immigration, and urbanization
      • The emergence of the U.S. as a world power
      • Progressive Era, Roaring Twenties, and the Great Depression
      • International relations and conflicts: World War I, World War II, Cold War, Korean War, Vietnam War, conflict in the Middle East
      • Suffrage and civil rights
      • Development of American culture and subcultures
      • New technologies and industries
      • Contemporary U.S. and Washington state
      • Analyzes and interprets historical materials from a variety of perspectives in U.S. history (1877- present).
      • Analyzes how a historical event in U.S. history helps us to understand a current issue (1877 – present).

      Social Studies Skills

      • Understands reasons based on evidence for a position about events in U.S. history, including Washington state history.

      Teachers

      Science

      Physical Science

      • Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.
      • Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.
      • Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.
      • Apply scientific principles to design, construct, and test a device that either minimizes or maximizes thermal energy transfer.
      • Plan an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass, and the change in the average kinetic energy of the particles as measured by the temperature of the sample.
      • Construct, use, and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.

      Life Science

      • Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
      • Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.
      • Gather and synthesize information that sensory receptors respond to stimuli by sending messages to the brain for immediate behavior or storage as memories.
      • Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.
      • Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.
      • Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals’ probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.
      • Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms.
      • Use mathematical representations to support explanations of how natural selection may lead to increases and decreases of specific traits in populations over time.

      Earth and Space Science

      • Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
      • Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
      • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence from rock strata for how the geologic time scale is used to organize Earth’s 4.6-billion-year old history.
      • Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
      • Analyze and interpret data on the distribution of fossils and rocks, continental shapes, and seafloor structures to provide evidence of the past plate motions.
      • Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects.
      • Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

      Teachers

      Mathematics

      8th Grade Mathematics

      • The Number System
        • Know that there are numbers that are not rational, and approximate them by rational numbers.
      • Expressions & Equations
        • Expressions and equations work with radicals and integer exponents.
        • Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations.
        • Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
      • Functions
        • Define, evaluate, and compare functions.
        • Use functions to model relationships between quantities
      • Geometry
        • Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software.
        • Understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
        • Solves real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones and spheres.
      • Statistics & Probability
        • Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.

      Algebra

      • Quantities
        • Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
      • The Real Number System
        • Extend the properties of exponents to rational exponents and use properties of rational and irrational numbers
      • Creating Equations
        • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
      • Seeing Structure in Expressions
        • Interpret the structure of expressions, perform arithmetic operations on polynomials, and write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
      • Reasoning with Equations & Inequalities
        • Solve equations and inequalities in one variable.
        • Represent and solve systems of equations and inequalities.
      • Interpreting Functions
        • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation.
        • Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of a context.
        • Analyze functions using different representations.
          Building
      • Building Functions
        • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities and build new functions from existing functions.
      • Linear, Quadratic, & Exponential Models
        • Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models, solve problems, and interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
      • Interpreting Categorical & Quantitative Data
        • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.
        • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables, and interpret linear models.
      • Building Functions
        • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities and build new functions from existing functions.

      Geometry

      • Congruence
        • Experiment with transformations in the plane.
        • Understand congruence in terms of rigid motions.
        • Prove geometric theorems.
        • Make geometric constructions
      • Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry
        • Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations.
        • Prove theorems involving similarity.
        • Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles.
        • Apply trigonometry to general triangles.
      • Circles
        • Understand and apply theorems about circles; including finding arc lengths and areas of sectors circles.
      • Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations
        • Translate between the geometric description and the equation for a conic section.
        • Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically.
      • Geometric Measurement and Dimension
        • Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems; visualize relationship between two- dimensional and three-dimensional objects.
      • Modeling with Geometry
        • Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations.
      • Conditional Probability and the Rules of Probability
        • . Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
        • Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
        • Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.

      Teachers

      Electives

      Fitness Level I

      • Develops motor skills and movement concepts as developmentally appropriate.
      • Acquires the knowledge and skills to safely participate in a variety of developmentally appropriate physical activities
      • Understands the components of health-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
      • Understands the components of skill-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
      • Analyzes personal fitness information to develop and monitor a fitness plan.

      Digital Photography

      This course will focus on the knowledge, skills and techniques, and creative process of Photographic Art. In this course you will delve into an abundance of artists, graphic styles, and motivations while building your skills to be more creative in your photographic artistic abilities. In addition you will become familiar with various careers and opportunities in the photographic art.
      In this class you will...
      • Create all sorts of amazing photographic ART!
      • Develop your knowledge of camera functions and photography techniques
      • Develop skills to digitally manipulate images with Photoshop software
      • Convey personal meaning through the creation and presentation of artwork
      • Discuss photographic art and artists from across the world and through time
      • Interpret intent, function, and meaning in artwork and artistic movements
      • Work collaboratively to generate artistic ideas and problem solve
      • Reflect and critique the art work created by you and your peers
      • For more information please contact Rachael Larsen (pictured)

      Art Exploration

      This course is filled with projects and activities that will boost your critical thinking habits, improve your collaborative participation, grown your creativity, and develop your communication skills though making, writing, and talking about art. We will focus our learning of art through a variety of materials, a weekly Mystery Artist, and productive studio habits.
      In this class you will...
      • Create all sorts of amazing ART!
      • Develop your knowledge of color theory, drawings, and painting skills, and basic sculpture techniques
      • Organize a sketchbook to form and share your ideas and keep track of information
      • Discuss art and artists from across the world and through time
      • Interpret intent, function, and meaning in artwork and artistic movements
      • Work collaboratively to generate artistic ideas and problem solve
      • Convey personal meaning through the creation and presentation of artwork
      • Reflect and critique the art work created by you and your peers
      • For more information please contact Rachael Larsen (pictured)

      Food and Culinary Foundations

      • If you would like the opportunity to advance your skills in the kitchen, this is the class for you. As you develop your skills, you are able to become more creative with the dishes you prepare.
      • In this course you will have the opportunity to take your previous skills to the next level by planning and preparing your own meals, then demonstrating your consumer awareness through grocery and product selection.
      • In addition, you will become familiar with various careers and opportunities in the food industry.
      • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

      International Foods

      • If you would like to travel the world together—tasting the different kinds of foods from many cultures, this is the class for you!
      • This semester course is designed for the student who wishes to prepare a variety of foods originating from all over the world.
      • Various regions of the world will be covered including North America, Latin America, Europe, the Mediterranean, Asia, and the Mid-East among others. Various preparation techniques reflecting individual ethnic cooking styles will also be demonstrated as an essential part of the class.
      • Students will study patterns of family meals, current customs and food habits, and cooking techniques and equipment unique to those countries.
      • Sign up for this class if you enjoy tasting foods from around the world.
      • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

      Spanish

      • This full-year language immersion style course is the equivalent of high school Spanish 1.
      • Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to go on to Spanish II at the high school.
      • This academic language immersion course seeks to develop speaking, listening, writing and reading skills, while at the same time focusing on grammar concepts.
      • Students will explore Spanish-speaking culture throughout this course as we cover various topics such as; greetings, introductions, numbers, letters, colors, telling time, self-descriptions, likes/dislikes, pastimes, food, preferences, family, clothing and more!
      • For more information please contact Daniel Arroyo (pictured)

      Team Sports

      • Students in Team Sports will learn and apply physical fitness concepts, principles and strategies that promote lifelong fitness.
      • Emphasis in Team Sports will be on improving skills such as throwing, catching, striking and kicking. Students will apply skills in a variety of team sports and will be introduced to regulation rules and advanced play.
      • This course is designed to be a competitive class and will present the opportunity for all students to participate in a variety of team sports.
      • Emphasis will also be placed on teamwork, sportsmanship, healthy competition, and improving skills through participation and practice. Activities may include the following: basketball, volleyball, flag/flash football, softball, floor hockey, soccer, ultimate Frisbee, and soft lacrosse.
      • For more information please contact Azuma Bearden, Neil Kells or Sue Smith

      Individual/Dual Sports

      • This course is designed for the self-motivated individual who would like to improve their physical fitness.
      • Emphasis will be placed on cooperative play and aerobic activities. This class will also provide opportunities for all students to learn fundamental techniques, rules, and strategies used in individual and dual sports.
      • Units may include tennis, bowling, badminton, archery, pickleball and Frisbee golf. The development and practice of skills through competitive play will be offered.
      • This is a great opportunity for students to enhance their personal fitness, individual skills and to work with others in a partner setting.
      • For more information please contact Azuma Bearden, Neil Kells or Sue Smith

      Leadership

      • Leadership gives students the opportunity to learn new ways in which they can become successful leaders at Kamiakin, in their community, family, and personal relationships.
      • Based on the idea that true leadership is about serving others, this course will focus on understanding personality traits, character development, personal growth, and building strong relationships and teams. Also covered will be listening and speaking skills, conflict mediation, diversity acceptance, and a community service project.
      • In addition to being role models for their peers, all members of the leadership class are also expected to help plan and participate in school-wide initiatives and activities such as assemblies, dances, fundraisers, and ongoing community building. Come have fun, work hard, and make Kamiakin a better place!
      • For more information please contact Karyn Taggart (pictured)

      Music

      Wind Ensemble

      • Members of this ensemble work to attain the highest musical standards and rehearse daily to refine instrumental skills in order to perform advanced literature for appreciative audience and professional adjudicators.
      • The Kamiakin Wind Ensemble performs at quarterly concerts and represents our school and community at band festivals in either Washington, Oregon or Canada.
      • Formal tuxedo-style vests and ties are worn to illustrate the professional approach this band brings to each and every concert.
      • The Wind Ensemble is known for bringing emotion and excitement to the compositions they study. From their thrilling rendition of “Pirates of the Caribbean” to the proud marches and exciting overtures they offer adjudicators, emphasis in this course is on musical communication within the group and to an audience.
      • After many years together, the Wind Ensemble enjoys the close-knit feeling of “family” as they complete their middle school band experience and look forward to the excitement of high school band.
      • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey
      • Units
        • Rhythmic Analysis: Level IV (8th grade)
          Areas of Focus: Music theory & time analysis.
          Assessment Tools: Submitted via recording.
        • Study of 12 harmonic minor scale
          Areas of Focus: Basic music theory & intervals.
          Assessment Tools: Submitted via recording.
        • Continuation of “EIP” grant.
          Areas of Focus: Refinement of skills within the three “EIP” sections
          Assessment Tools: Assessed by Seattle Youth Symphony and band director each May.
          Rehearsal & Performance Literature
          Areas of Focus: Selections are based on strengths and weaknesses of the band.
          Assessment Tools: Ongoing assessment throughout year while highlighting performance pieces.
          Tone production, instrumental technique & facility
          Areas of Focus: Individual growth and technical facility on instrument.
          Assessment Tools: Chair tryouts (3 per year, alternating between in-class and individually recorded). Rubric is used to gauge five main points of excerpt.
          Solo/Ensemble
          Areas of Focus: Individual and/or small group preparation for judged festival.
          Assessment Tools: Professional adjudicator offers ratings of I, II, III, IV or V.
          “Winterfest” performance
          Areas of Focus: Large group preparation & performance at Seattle event. “Training” for more distant trips.
          Assessment Tools: Successful trip and performance with instruments, music, logistics, equipment vans, uniforms, etc

      Jazz Ensemble

      • This group is Kamiakin’s most mobile and busy ensemble with many bookings each year at regular concerts, community events, fundraisers and school functions.
      • The main focus throughout the school year will be on the famous “big band” styles of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and other notable big bands.
      • Kamiakin’s Jazz Ensemble also breaks into smaller groups to study “combo” and “Dixieland” styles. Opportunities for improvisation abound in all types of jazz offered as Kamiakin’s jazz musicians maintain a tradition of excellence.
      • Students interested in auditioning for and performing with our award-winning Jazz Ensemble are expected to have attained a reasonable amount of skill and technique on their instrument in order to perform selections acceptably.
      • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey

      Orchestra

      • The string orchestra is an excellent opportunity for students to expand their musical repertoire from all periods of history and musical styles while obtaining more advanced skills.
      • The class will focus on musicianship and ensemble playing with an emphasis on technical skills such as intonation, vibrato, shifting and bow technique.
      • We will perform at school concerts and district festivals.
      • Opportunities to join the district honor group and to play at the solo/ensemble festivals are available for more advanced students.
      • For more information please contact Kim Merkley (pictured)

      Additional Programs

      6th Grade Courses


      Core Courses

      Language Arts

      In Language Arts, students develop their vocabulary and reading comprehension skills in a variety of literary and informational
      texts, through both in-class and independent reading experiences. They deepen what they know about texts by analyzing literary/story elements, literary devices, and text organizational structures. They learn to evaluate texts and authors and to share reading experiences with others. In writing, students build on what they have learned in previous grades about writing for different audiences and purposes, the writing process and traits of effective writing. They deepen their understanding and skills with regard to expository writing and are introduced to persuasive writing. They learn to evaluate their own writing and to reflect on their own progress as writers.

      Reading informational Text

      • Key Ideas and Details
        • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
        • Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
        • Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through example and anecdotes).
      • Craft and Structure
        • Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings.
        • Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
          Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
        • Determine meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings.
      • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
        • Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
        • Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
        • Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
      • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
        • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

      Reading Literature

      • Key Ideas and Details
        • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
        • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
        • Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
      • Craft and Structure
        • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
        • Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
        • Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
      • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
        • Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
        • Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
        • Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
      • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
        • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

      Teachers

      Social Studies

      Civics

      • Understands a variety of forms of government from the past or present.
      • Analyzes how societies have interacted with one another in the past or present.

      Economics and Geography

      • Understands the production, distribution, and consumption of goods,services, and resources in societies from the past or in the present.
      • Identifies the location of places and regions in the world and understands their physical and cultural characteristics.
      • Understands and analyzes how the environment has affected people and how people have affected the environment in the past or present.
      • Understands the characteristics of cultures in the world from the past or in the present.

      History

      • Understands and analyzes how cultures and cultural groups in ancient civilizations contributed to world history.
      • Understands and analyzes how technology and ideas from ancient civilizations have impacted world history.

      Social Studies Skills

      • Understands and demonstrates the ethical responsibility one has in using and citing sources and the rules related to plagiarism and copyrighting.

      Teachers

      Science

      Physical Science

      • Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.
      • Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.
      • Conduct an investigation and evaluate the experimental design to provide evidence that fields exist between objects exerting forces on each other even though the objects are not in contact.
      • Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.
      • Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in a wave.
      • Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.
      • Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information to support the claim that digitized signals are a more reliable way to encode and transmit information than analog signals.

      Life Science

      • Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
      • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.
      • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
      • Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
      • Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

      Earth and Space Science

      • Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscience processes have changed Earth’s surface at varying time and spatial scales.
      • Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
      • Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
      • Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.

      Engineering and Technology

      • Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.
      • Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
      • Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
      • Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

      Teachers

      Mathematics

      Mathematics


        • Ratio & Proportional Relationships
          • Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
        • The Number System
          • Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to divide fractions by fractions.
          • Compute fluently with multi-digit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
          • Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.
        • Expressions & Equations
          • Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
          • Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
          • Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.
        • Geometry
          • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume.
        • Statistics & Probability
          • Develop understanding of statistical variability.
          • Summarize and describe distributions.

      Teachers


      Electives

      Fitness Level I

      • Develops motor skills and movement concepts as developmentally appropriate.
      • Acquires the knowledge and skills to safely participate in a variety of developmentally appropriate physical activities.
      • Understands the components of health-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
      • Understands the components of skill-related fitness and interprets information from feedback, evaluation, and self-assessment in order to improve performance.
      • Analyzes personal fitness information to develop and monitor a fitness plan.

      Computer

      • Focus on the LWSD Technology Standards.
      • In this class, students will develop skills in Keyboarding, Desktop Publishing, Digital Presentations and Digital Citizenship.
      • We will be using Microsoft Office 2016 as the base for the curriculum.
      • The primary course components will include: Type to Learn, Word 2016, PowerPoint 2016, Publisher 2016, Excel 2016 and Microsoft Movie Maker.
      • For more information please contact Christina Gregori (pictured)

      Art Adventure 1, 2

      • This class will create with everything from the techniques of clay to the beauty of three dimensional shading.
      • We will look into history to study some of the Art Masters and interpret their styles into a painting, a painting filled with expressive paint, like the impressionists.
      • Come learn more about the arts and how to use them as an expressive form of communication.
      • Did you know that visual art is a language all its own and that developing this language can help your brain process other subjects too!
      • Let’s learn more about the language of visual art. Creativity is powerful, come join the adventure.
      • For more information please contact Rachael Larsen (pictured)

      Food Foundations

      • Throughout our lives we develop a relationship with food. In this class you will prepare an impressive variety of foods.
      • Students exhibit initiative, organization, creativity, independence and personal responsibility.
      • Topics covered include use of small and large appliances, lab planning and preparation skills, use of class time, measuring/mixing equipment/skills, teamwork, leadership and organizational skills.
      • Areas of study include; sanitation and safety, kitchen equipment cooking methods, kitchen math and science, recipes and food labels, production and meal planning, food groups, etc.
      • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

      Consumer Life Skills

      • This course examines life management skills in the areas of food, wellness, textiles (sewing), personal and family living, nutrition, financial management, interior design, appropriate child development practices and job skills.
      • Emphasis is placed on students applying these skills during their pre-teen years.
      • This course offers flexibility for beginning students as well as advanced students in Family and Consumer Sciences content area.
      • This is a class you will never forget. Sign up and learn something new that applies to your life.
      • For more information please contact Shiree Taylor (pictured)

      Music

      Concert Band

      • Kamiakin’s Concert Band is a fantastic way to make friends and music as you enter into your middle school experience! This course is open to all instrumentalists who have completed elementary band at any school (special permission may be given to musically-trained students wishing to begin band in 6th grade).
      • The emphasis of the class is on growing together as a well balanced group, musical excellence and individual progress.
      • In addition to quarterly concerts, this band represents Kamiakin at our district band festival (road trip!) and members have the chance to play as a soloist or in a small ensemble every March.
      • Students enrolled in this band will also have the opportunity to audition for Washington’s “Jr. All-State Band”! In middle school, musical literature is carefully selected to enhance the band’s overall sound and experience.
      • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey
      • Assessments

      • Weekly practice logs
      • In class playing tests
      • Music theory test/quizzes
      • SmartMusic® recording projects
      • Concert performances
      • Written self and peer evaluations
      • Written concert review/evaluation

      • Resources/ Technology

      • Various band method books
      • Concert literature
      • Listening examples
      • Electronic tuner
      • Metronome
      • Music theory and rhythm study software
      • SmartMusic® software

      • Units
        • Rhythmic Analysis: Level I (6th grade)
          Areas of Focus: Music theory & time analysis in conjunction with metronome.
          Assessment Tools: Submitted via recording throughout year.
        • Study and mastery of three common key signatures: Bb, Eb, Ab
          Areas of Focus: Basic music theory & intervals (half steps, whole steps, ascending/descending).
          Assessment Tools: Visual hand cues indicating sharps/flats, implementation in chorales (Swearingen chorale book) and literature.
        • Introduction of “EIP” grant.
          Areas of Focus: Introduction to instrument(s), proper choice made, basic skills within the three “EIP” sections.
          Assessment Tools: Assessed by Seattle Youth Symphony and band director each May.
        • Rehearsal & Performance Literature
          Areas of Focus: Selections are based on strengths and weaknesses of the band.
          Assessment Tools: Ongoing assessment throughout year while highlighting performance pieces.
        • Tone production, instrumental technique & facility
          Areas of Focus: Individual growth and technical facility on instrument.
          Assessment Tools: Chair tryouts (4 per year, alternating between in-class and individually recorded). Rubric is used to gauge five main points of excerpt.
        • Solo/Ensemble
          Areas of Focus: Individual and/or small group preparation for judged festival.
          Assessment Tools: Professional adjudicator offers ratings of I, II, III, IV or V.
        • “Winterfest” performance
          Areas of Focus: Large group preparation & performance at district event. “Training” for more distant trips.
          Assessment Tools: Successful trip and performance with instruments, music, logistics, equipment vans, uniforms, etc.

      Jazz Ensemble

      • This group is Kamiakin’s most mobile and busy ensemble with many bookings each year at regular concerts, community events, fundraisers and school functions.
      • The main focus throughout the school year will be on the famous “big band” styles of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and other notable big bands.
      • Kamiakin’s Jazz Ensemble also breaks into smaller groups to study “combo” and “Dixieland” styles.
      • Opportunities for improvisation abound in all types of jazz offered as Kamiakin’s jazz musicians maintain a tradition of excellence.
      • Students interested in auditioning for and performing with our award-winning Jazz Ensemble are expected to have attained a reasonable amount of skill and technique on their instrument in order to perform selections acceptably.
      • For more information please contact Elizabeth Currey

      Orchestra

      • The string orchestra is an excellent opportunity for students to expand their musical repertoire from all periods of history and musical styles while obtaining more advanced skills.
      • The class will focus on musicianship and ensemble playing with an emphasis on technical skills such as intonation, vibrato, shifting and bow technique.
      • We will perform at school concerts and district festivals.
      • Opportunities to join the district honor group and to play at the solo/ensemble festivals are available for more advanced students.
      • For more information please contact Kim Merkley (pictured)

      Additional Programs

      ELL Language Arts

      • This course focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary and strategies for reading and writing. ELL addresses the needs of culturally diverse, non-English or limited-English speaking students.
      • Students will learn to read, write and speak English. Students qualify for ELL by taking the Washington Language Proficiency Test (WLPT). Students will use the “6 + 1 traits” and “Step Up to Writing” to learn writing skills. Students write a compare/contrast essay, a five paragraph essay and a persuasive essay. They read fiction and non-fiction pieces from the Prentice Hall Literature book as well as other selections.
      • Weekly computer sessions using “Rosetta Stone” (an individualized computer language program) reinforce language skills. Oral communication is developed through question and answering sessions as well as giving oral reports.
      • To get more information about this program please contact Kendall Schuldt (pictured) OR Click here

      Special Education

      Language Arts/Reading(SDI Funct. Eng.)

      Individualized Education Plan (IEP) required. This is an individualized program that includes reading, writing, spelling, vocabulary and phonics, with an emphasis on application of these skills.

      Essential Understandings
      • Create quality products and presentations to communicate
      information
      • Use of the writing process
      • Learn to spell, utilizing phonetics and word structures
      • Use of a proofreading guide, to edit student’s own writing
      • Use of a variety of text forms (recount, letters, procedure, books, reports, signs, posters and displays)
      • Use of a variety of strategies, to construct meaning from
      different reading materials
      • Use of a variety of phonic/word-attack strategies
      • Ability to re-tell, discuss, and interpret what is read or viewed

      Activities/Challenges
      • Journal writing
      • Spelling lessons
      • Cooperative groups
      • Vocabulary and spelling building activities
      • Creative writing - narrative
      • Report writing - expository, process, persuasive
      • Reading program
      • Grammar activities

      Assessment Tools
      • Teacher-created and/or program tests
      • Grading rubrics
      • Benchmarking and progress monitoring
      • Curriculum based measurements

      Resources/Technology/Materials
      • Use of computers for research, word processing, and graphics
      • Use of library resources
      • My Access writing program
      • Step Up to Writing; 6+1 Writing Traits
      • INSIDE Language, Literacy and Content (National Geographic School Publishing)
      • SRA Morphographic Spelling
      • PowerSchool

      Math Lab (SDI General Math)

      Individualized Education Plan (IEP) required. This class addresses fluency, calculation, and math reasoning.
      All Lake Washington junior high mathematics courses are designed to teach and assess:

      • Reading and writing of mathematical procedures,
      • Reading and writing of mathematical explanations,
      • Reading of texts and other mathematics curriculum materials,
      • Responding to short answer and extended response questions
      using MSP-like scoring guides.

      Core Processes – Computation and understanding of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals
      Students will increase accuracy in computation of numbers, both whole and fractional, and compare and order numbers, both whole and fractional. Students will gain a real world understanding of numbers, their use in the world and application to real world situations.

      Core Processes – Reasoning, problem solving, and communication
      Students refine their reasoning and problem-solving skills as they move more fully into the symbolic world of algebra and higher-level mathematics. They demonstrate the ability to understand and communicate mathematical ideas, to generalize, to draw conclusions, and to verify the reasonableness of solutions to problems.

      Activities/Challenges
      Daily assignments addressing overall math concepts, problem solving, and math fluency. The class primarily uses the Cognitive Tutor: Bridge to Algebra. This program integrates collaborative class work with individualized computer practice.

      Resources/Technology
      • Cognitive tutor
      • Computers
      • Calculators
      • PowerSchool
      • Cognitive Tutor

      Assessment Tools
      • Chapter tests
      • Quizzes
      • Curriculum based measurements
      • Benchmarking and progress monitoring
      • Cognitive Tutor progress monitoring

      Strategies for Success- IEP Students (SDI Organization)

      This daily class is designed for students who are on an IEP and qualify for specially-designed instruction in work completion, study social skills, behavior and/or organizational skills. In addition to receiving specially-designed instruction in study and organizational strategies, time will be designated for the application of these skills in the students’ content-area assignments/projects.

      Essential Understandings
      • Demonstrate quality in the workplace by showing pride in work
      • Assume responsibility for assigned tasks and self
      • Work independently
      • Exhibit initiative, organization, punctuality, and daily attendance
      • Demonstrate dependability and honesty
      • Express self-advocacy clearly and appropriately

      Critical Content/Process and Skills
      • Organization of materials and thoughts through writing in the
      content area
      • Study skills, test taking, time management.
      • Self-advocacy skill training and application
      • Strategies in listening skills

      Resources/Technology
      • Students will be given computer access for research, word processing, graphics, presentations, and to find literary sources and texts.
      • Netbooks - organization and management
      • PowerSchool

      Assessment Tools
      • Weekly pre/post tests and quizzes on each unit of study skills
      strategies.
      • Rubrics for planner, binder and netbook checks
      • Curriculum based measurements

      • Special education staff at Kamiakin Middle School provide specially designed instruction in basic skill areas.
      • Students who qualify for special education services in the areas of math, reading, or written language are offered regularly scheduled courses in a small group setting.
      • Research based curriculum in each course provides remediation in that basic skill area.
      • The aim of this remediation is to offer students strategies and skills which will help them to be successful in the general education classroom and strive toward district and state standards.
      • Kamiakin students with developmental or physical difficulties will have individualized programs designed to meet each student’s specific needs.
      • These programs will be developed through the IEP process by specialists, parents, and general education faculty in order to meet developmental needs while involving each student in the Kamiakin Community.
      • To get more information about this program please contact Karyn George (pictured left) or Liz Spier (pictured right) OR Click here

      Quest Program

      • Quest is open to all students residing within the district who meet district criteria for identifying highly capable students.
      • Applicants must apply through the Quest office and must demonstrate high academic achievement and cognitive ability.
      • Quest offers acceleration and enrichment of core curriculum in the areas of language arts, social studies, and science. Providing academic challenge for highly capable learners, classes include greater breadth and depth of subject matter, a wide variety of learning processes and teaching methods, and high expectations for student work and achievement.
      • The core classes in the Quest program demand students use full intellectual capacity to stretch their minds beyond the bounds of the traditional middle school curriculum.
      • Students engage in critical thinking, reading and writing activities that are more often found in high school classes.
      • They are expected to be self-directed, maintain above average grades, and complete quality work.
      • Click here to get more information about this program.

      ELL Language Arts

      • This course focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary and strategies for reading and writing. ELL addresses the needs of culturally diverse, non-English or limited-English speaking students.
      • Students will learn to read, write and speak English. Students qualify for ELL by taking the Washington Language Proficiency Test (WLPT). Students will use the “6 + 1 traits” and “Step Up to Writing” to learn writing skills. Students write a compare/contrast essay, a five paragraph essay and a persuasive essay. They read fiction and non-fiction pieces from the Prentice Hall Literature book as well as other selections.
      • Weekly computer sessions using “Rosetta Stone” (an individualized computer language program) reinforce language skills.
      • Oral communication is developed through question and answering sessions as well as giving oral reports.
      • For more information please contact Kendall Schuldt (pictured) or Click here .

      Special Education

      • Special education staff at Kamiakin Middle School provide specially designed instruction in basic skill areas.
      • Students who qualify for special education services in the areas of math, reading, or written language are offered regularly scheduled courses in a small group setting.
      • Research based curriculum in each course provides remediation in that basic skill area. The aim of this remediation is to offer students strategies and skills which will help them to be successful in the general education classroom and strive toward district and state standards.
      • Kamiakin students with developmental or physical difficulties will have individualized programs designed to meet each student’s specific needs.
      • These programs will be developed through the IEP process by specialists, parents, and general education faculty in order to meet developmental needs while involving each student in the Kamiakin Community.
      • For more information please contact Karyn George (pictured left) or Liz Spier (pictured right) OR Click here.

      Quest Program

      • Quest is open to all students residing within the district who meet district criteria for identifying highly capable students.
      • Applicants must apply through the Quest office and must demonstrate high academic achievement and cognitive ability.
      • Quest offers acceleration and enrichment of core curriculum in the areas of language arts, social studies, and science.
      • Providing academic challenge for highly capable learners, classes include greater breadth and depth of subject matter, a wide variety of learning processes and teaching methods, and high expectations for student work and achievement.
      • The core classes in the Quest program demand students use full intellectual capacity to stretch their minds beyond the bounds of the traditional middle school curriculum.
      • Students engage in critical thinking, reading and writing activities that are more often found in high school classes. They are expected to be self-directed, maintain above average grades, and complete quality work.
      • Click here to get more information about this program.